How to Assess the Real Cost of a Fixer-Upper House

How to Assess the Real Cost of a Fixer-Upper House
Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com
By: G. M. Filisko
Published: August 24, 2010
When you buy a fixer-upper house or Grand Junction Foreclosure, you can save a ton of money, or get yourself in a financial fix.
Trying to decide whether to buy a fixer-upper house? Follow these seven steps, and you’ll know how much you can afford, how much to offer, and whether a fixer-upper house is right for you.
1. Decide what you can do yourself
TV remodeling shows make home improvement work look like a snap. In the real world, attempting a difficult remodeling job that you don’t know how to do will take longer than you think and can lead to less-than-professional results that won’t increase the value of your fixer-upper house.
•Do you really have the skills to do it? Some tasks, like stripping wallpaper and painting, are relatively easy. Others, like electrical work, can be dangerous when done by amateurs.
•Do you really have the time and desire to do it? Can you take time off work to renovate your fixer-upper house? If not, will you be stressed out by living in a work zone for months while you complete projects on the weekends?
2. Price the cost of repairs and remodeling before you make an offer
•Get your contractor into the house to do a walk-through, so he can give you a written cost estimate on the tasks he’s going to do.
•If you’re doing the work yourself, price the supplies.
•Either way, tack on 10% to 20% to cover unforeseen problems that often arise with a fixer-upper house.
3. Check permit costs
•Ask local officials if the work you’re going to do requires a permit and how much that permit costs. Doing work without a permit may save money, but it’ll cause problems when you resell your home.
•Decide if you want to get the permits yourself or have the contractor arrange for them. Getting permits can be time-consuming and frustrating. Inspectors may force you to do additional work, or change the way you want to do a project, before they give you the permit.
•Factor the time and aggravation of permits into your plans.
4. Doublecheck pricing on structural work
If your fixer-upper home needs major structural work, hire a structural engineer for $500 to $700 to inspect the home before you put in an offer so you can be confident you’ve uncovered and conservatively budgeted for the full extent of the problems.

Get written estimates for repairs before you commit to buying a home with structural issues.

Don’t purchase a home that needs major structural work unless:
•You’re getting it at a steep discount
•You’re sure you’ve uncovered the extent of the problem
•You know the problem can be fixed
•You have a binding written estimate for the repairs
5. Check the cost of financing
Be sure you have enough money for a downpayment, closing costs, and repairs without draining your savings.

If you’re planning to fund the repairs with a home equity (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/consider-home-equity-line-of-credit/) or home improvement loan:
•Get yourself pre-approved for both loans before you make an offer.
•Make the deal contingent on getting both the purchase money loan and the renovation money loan, so you’re not forced to close the sale when you have no loan to fix the house.
•Consider the Federal Housing Administration’s Section 203(k) program (http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/203k/203kmenu.cfm), which is designed to help home owners who are purchasing or refinancing a home that needs rehabilitation. The program wraps the purchase/refinance and rehabilitation costs into a single mortgage. To qualify for the loan, the total value of the property must fall within the FHA mortgage limit for your area, as with other FHA loans. A streamlined 203(k) program provides an additional amount for rehabilitation, up to $35,000, on top of an existing mortgage. It’s a simpler process than obtaining the standard 203(k).
6. Calculate your fair purchase offer
Take the fair market value of the property (what it would be worth if it were in good condition and remodeled to current tastes) and subtract the upgrade and repair costs.
For example: Your target fixer-upper house has a 1960s kitchen, metallic wallpaper, shag carpet, and high levels of radon in the basement.

Your comparison house, in the same subdivision, sold last month for $200,000. That house had a newer kitchen, no wallpaper, was recently recarpeted, and has a radon mitigation system in its basement.
The cost to remodel the kitchen, remove the wallpaper, carpet the house, and put in a radon mitigation system is $40,000. Your bid for the house should be $160,000.
Ask your real estate agent if it’s a good idea to share your cost estimates with the sellers, to prove your offer is fair.
7. Include inspection contingencies in your offer
Don’t rely on your friends or your contractor to eyeball your fixer-upper house. Hire pros to do common inspections like:
•Home inspection. This is key in a fixer-upper assessment. The home inspector will uncover hidden issues in need of replacement or repair. You may know you want to replace those 1970s kitchen cabinets, but the home inspector has a meter that will detect the water leak behind them.
•Radon, mold, lead-based paint
•Septic and well
•Pest
Most home inspection contingencies let you go back to the sellers and ask them to do the repairs, or give you cash at closing to pay for the repairs. The seller can also opt to simply back out of the deal, as can you, if the inspection turns up something you don’t want to deal with.

If that happens, this isn’t the right fixer-upper house for you. Go back to the top of this list and start again.
More from HouseLogic
What you need to know about foundation repairs (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/what-you-need-know-about-foundation-repairs/)

Budgeting for a home remodel (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/budget-for-remodel/)

Tips on hiring a contractor (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/five-essential-questions-ask-before-hiring-contractor/)
Other web resources
This Old House remodeling cost estimates (http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-advice/estimated-remodeling-and-repair-costs.shtml)

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer whose parents bought and renovated a fixer-upper when she was a teen. A regular contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

8 Tips for Finding Your New Grand Junction Home

Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com
 By: G. M. Filisko
Published: February 10, 2010
A solid game plan can help you narrow your homebuying search to find the best home for you.  These 8 Tips for Finding Your New Grand Junction Home can help.
House hunting is just like any other shopping expedition. If you identify exactly what you want and do some research, you’ll zoom in on the home you want at the best price. These eight tips will guide you through a smart homebuying process.
1. Know thyself
Understand the type of home that suits your personality. Do you prefer a new or existing home? A ranch or a multistory home? If you’re leaning toward a fixer-upper, are you truly handy, or will you need to budget for contractors?
2. Research before you look
List the features you most want in a home and identify which are necessities and which are extras. Identify three to four neighborhoods you’d like to live in based on commute time, schools, recreation, crime, and price. Then hop onto REALTOR.com (http://REALTOR.com) to get a feel for the homes available in your price range in your favorite neighborhoods. Use the results to prioritize your wants and needs so you can add in and weed out properties from the inventory you’d like to view.
3. Get your finances in order
Generally, lenders say you can afford a home priced two to three times your gross income. Create a budget so you know how much you’re comfortable spending each month on housing. Don’t wait until you’ve found a home and made an offer to investigate financing.

Gather your financial records and meet with a lender to get a prequalification letter spelling out how much you’re eligible to borrow. The lender won’t necessarily consider the extra fees you’ll pay when you purchase or your plans to begin a family or purchase a new car, so shop in a price range you’re comfortable with. Also, presenting an offer contingent on financing will make your bid less attractive to sellers.
4. Set a moving timeline
Do you have blemishes on your credit that will take time to clear up? If you already own, have you sold your current home? If not, you’ll need to factor in the time needed to sell. If you rent, when is your lease up? Do you expect interest rates to jump anytime soon? All these factors will affect your buying, closing, and moving timelines.
5. Think long term
Your future plans may dictate the type of home you’ll buy. Are you looking for a starter house with plans to move up in a few years, or do you hope to stay in the home for five to 10 years? With a starter, you may need to adjust your expectations. If you plan to nest, be sure your priority list helps you identify a home you’ll still love years from now.
6. Work with a REALTOR;
Ask people you trust for referrals to a real estate professional they trust. Interview agents to determine which have expertise in the neighborhoods and type of homes you’re interested in. Because homebuying triggers many emotions, consider whether an agent’s style meshes with your personality.

  Also ask if the agent specializes in buyer representation. Unlike listing agents, whose first duty is to the seller, buyers’ reps work only for you even though they’re typically paid by the seller. Finally, check whether agents are REALTORS;, which means they’re members of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS;. NAR has been a champion of homeownership rights for more than a century.
7. Be realistic
It’s OK to be picky about the home and neighborhood you want, but don’t be close-minded, unrealistic, or blinded by minor imperfections. If you insist on living in a cul-de-sac, you may miss out on great homes on streets that are just as quiet and secluded.

On the flip side, don’t be so swayed by a “wow” feature that you forget about other issues-like noise levels-that can have a big impact on your quality of life. Use your priority list to evaluate each property, remembering there’s no such thing as the perfect home.
8. Limit the opinions you solicit
It’s natural to seek reassurance when making a big financial decision. But you know that saying about too many cooks in the kitchen. If you need a second opinion, select one or two people. But remain true to your list of wants and needs so the final decision is based on criteria you’ve identified as important.
More from HouseLogic
HOAs: What You Need to Know About Rules (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/hoas-what-you-need-to-know-about-rules/)

A Financial Plan for Your Home (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/a-financial-plan-for-your-home/)

When It Pays to Do It Yourself (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/when-it-pays-to-do-it-yourself/)
G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who has found happiness in a brownstone in a historic Chicago neighborhood. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Find the Best Agent to Sell Your House

Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com

By: G. M. Filisko
Published: March 11, 2010


Ask detailed questions about their experience and skills to help you find the right agent for your home sale.

Working with the right Grand Junction real estate agent can mean the difference between getting prompt, expert representation and feeling like you’re going it alone when selling your Grand Junction home. Here are 10 questions to ask when you’re interviewing agents.

1. How long have you been selling Grand Junction homes?
Mastering real estate requires on-the-job experience. The more experience agents have, the more likely they’ll be able to handle any curveballs thrown during your home sale.
2. What designations do you hold?
Designations like GRI (Graduate REALTOR; Institute) and CRS® (Certified Residential Specialist), which require that agents complete additional real estate training, show they’re constantly learning. Ask if agents have designations and, if not, why not?
3. How many Grand Junction homes did you sell last year?
Agents may tout their company’s success. An equally important question is how many homes they’ve personally sold in the past year; it’s an indicator of how active and aggressive they are.
4. How many days on average did it take you to sell homes?
Ask agents to show you this data along with stats from their local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) so you can see how many days, on average, their listings were on the market compared to the average for all properties in the MLS.
5. How close were the asking and sales prices of the homes you sold?
Sometimes sellers choose their agent because the agent’s suggested listing price is higher than those suggested by other agents. A better factor is the difference between listing prices and the amount homes actually sold for. That can help you judge agents’ skill at accurately pricing homes and marketing to the right buyers. It can also help you weed out agents trying to dazzle you with a lofty sales price just to get your listing.
6. How will you market my Grand Junction home?
The days of agents putting a For Sale sign in the yard and hoping for the best are long gone. Look for an agent who does aggressive and innovative marketing, especially on the Internet.
7. Will you represent me exclusively?
In most states, agents can represent the seller, the buyer, or both in a home sale. If your agent will also represent buyers, understand and consent to that dual representation.
8. How will you keep me informed?
If you want weekly updates by email, don’t choose an agent who plans to contact you only if there’s an offer.
9. Can you provide references?
Ask to talk to the last three customers the agent assisted. Call and ask if they’d work with the agent again and if the agent did anything that didn’t sit well with them.
10. Are you a REALTOR?
Ask whether agents are REALTORS;, which means they’re members of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS; (NAR). NAR has been an advocate of agent professionalism and a champion of homeownership rights for more than a century.
G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who’s worked with many real estate agents in the past 20 years. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR; Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Luxury Homes in Grand Junction

When looking for Luxury Homes in Grand Junction you want to consider hiring a local luxury home expert.  There are some great areas in Grand Junction for Luxury Homes such as the Redlands Mesa Golf Course.  When deciding to choose your luxury home specialist consider the Real Estate Diva Team in Grand Junction, CO. 

Grand Junction Homes For Sale

When looking for Grand Junction Homes for Sale there are many ways to search.  The easiest is via a web based Grand Junction MLS search site such as the one provided by the Real Estate Diva Team.

For more info contact:

By Andrea Haitz
Google
Real Estate Diva Team
970-201-3578

Most desired homes in Grand Junction, CO

The Most desired home in Grand Junction, CO is between 1500 and 2000 sq ft, one-story rancher style layout with a medium sized lot. Most people buying real estate in Grand Junction want split bedrooms.

Andrea Haitz
970-201-3578
Broker/Owner Diva Team
Keller Williams Colorado West Realty

High End Realtor in Grand Junction

If you are looking for the best High End Realtor in Grand Junction, CO call Andrea Haitz with the Real Estate Diva Team 970-201-3578. Andrea has put together a solid team of realtors that know high end real estate and will provide high end service, but without the high-end attitude.

Andrea Haitz
970-201-3578
Broker/Owner Diva Team
Keller Williams Colorado West Realty

Luxury Homes in Grand Junction, CO

Are you looking for Luxury Homes in Grand Junction, CO? Your first step in selecting a luxury home realtor to to find someone who understands nice amenities and really listens to your wishes. Also, if you own a luxury home call the luxury home expert in Grand Junction, CO, Andrea Haitz with the Real Estate Diva Team.

970-201-3578
Andrea Haitz
Broker/Owner Diva Team
Keller Williams Colorado West Realty

HUD $100 Down Incentive is Back – Grand Junction, CO

The HUD $100 Down payment incentive is back and is getting a lot of attention in Grand Junction CO. To qualify you will need to meet a few criteria such as it must be your primary residence, you must use FHA financing and you will need to bring $1000 earnest money. Then your HUD expert realtor will need to make a special note of this when writing the HUD contract. Andrea Haitz and the Diva Team at Keller Williams Colo West Realty are the Grand Junction real estate experts when it comes to writing HUD offers and contracts.

970-201-3578
Andrea Haitz
Broker/Owner Diva Team
Keller Williams Colorado West Realty

HUD $100 Down Payment Program in Grand Junction, CO

I am excited to say that the HUD $100 Down payment program is back! That’s right. Make a full price offer on a HUD foreclosure and have your HUD approved real estate agent make the appropriate notations on the offer contract and you could be buying a home with $100 down. To learn more about making an offer on a HUD foreclosure and qualifying for the HUD $100 down program contact HUD approved agent in Grand Junction, CO Andrea Haitz 970-201-3578

 

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